Co-intervention bias

Knowledge of which treatments have been received by which study participants can affect adherence to assigned treatments and result in the biased use of other treatments (co-interventions). These biases can be reduced by using placebos to conceal the identities of the treatments being compared.


JLL Essay
2.3 Why avoiding differences between treatments allocated and treatments received is important

Helping people to stick to allocated treatments  

 

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Marks HM† (2006).
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Furberg CD (2009).
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Peto J (2016).
Reflections on the importance of strict adherence to treatment protocols: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children in the 1970s in the US and the UK. JLL Bulletin: Commentaries on the history of treatment evaluation.

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Zwarenstein M (2016).
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2.3 Why avoiding differences between treatments allocated and treatments received is important

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الفوارق بين المعالجات المقصودة والمعالجات المتلقَّاة فعلياً

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